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Organ-on-a-chip mimics the blood-brain barrier for better drug delivery

Organ-on-a-chip mimics the blood-brain barrier for better drug delivery

Breakthrough in organ-on-a-chip technology improves targeted drug delivery

Credit: ACS Nano (2024). DOI: 10.1021/acsnano.4c00994

Optimizing drug delivery systems (DDS) for the biological environment of organs and blood vessels is crucial for maximizing the effectiveness of drug treatment. A research team affiliated with UNIST has devised a new method to maximize the therapeutic efficacy of drugs using organ-on-a-chip (OoC) technology.

The findings, now published in ACS Nanosuggest that OoC technology offers promising opportunities for advancing research into vascular-targeted DDS due to the accurate simulation of molecular transport within endothelial systems.

The research team, jointly led by Professors Tae-Eun Park and Taejoon Kwon from UNIST’s Department of Biomedical Engineering, has created an OoC that mimics the blood-brain barrier (BBB) ​​via mouse cell culture, resulting in significantly improved permeability of therapeutic drugs . Using the cell-based phage display screening method, they accurately simulated the physiological characteristics of organs, setting a new standard for in vitro modeling.

Their findings demonstrated improved cerebrovascular permeability compared to conventional transwell methods. The research team expects that OoC technology will make an important contribution to the development of targeted treatments tailored to specific organs, including the liver, kidneys and lungs, among others.

The accurate replication of the biological environment within the chip, including the structure and function of glycocalyx on blood vessel surfaces, enabled the discovery of an effective peptide for drug delivery using simulated blood flow. This advanced simulation of shear stress and glycocalyx structure enabled the discovery of an effective peptide for drug delivery, demonstrating its potential for targeted treatments in various organs including liver, kidney, and lung.

The research team noted that OoC technology holds promise for advancing research into vascular-targeted DDS due to its accurate simulation of molecular transport within endothelial systems.

Co-author Jeong-Won Choi stated, “Long-term chip technology can be used as a powerful tool for discovering drug carriers with targeted functions by accurately mimicking biological environments.”

Co-author Kyungha Kim added: “We have proven that chip technology can accurately model human biological tissue in the long term, which opens up new possibilities for future research on drug delivery systems.”

More information:
Jeong-Won Choi et al, Organ-on-a-Chip approach for accelerating the discovery of nanoshuttles in the blood-brain barrier, ACS Nano (2024). DOI: 10.1021/acsnano.4c00994

Provided by Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology

Quote: Organ-on-a-chip mimics blood-brain barrier for better drug delivery (2024, July 1) Retrieved July 1, 2024, from https://phys.org/news/2024-07-chip-mimics-blood-brain-barrier.html

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