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Drivers with flat battery could face £2,500 fine, expert warns

Drivers with flat battery could face £2,500 fine, expert warns

The Clean Neighbourhoods and Environment Act 2005 states that carrying out work on a motor vehicle on the roadside is defined as “restricted work” and you may be fined for doing so.

Motorists can be fined if they repair their car on public roads(Getty Images/iStockphoto)

Motorists who carry out car repairs on public roads could be fined as much as £2,500.

With experts predicting a rise in breakdowns this summer, motorists are being warned that stopping to repair their vehicle on the public road could put them in serious trouble. During the heatwave in August last year, there was a 22 per cent spike in car breakdowns in the UK.




If motorists stop to fix problems such as a flat battery while they are driving, they could face a hefty fine. Under the Clean Neighbourhoods and Environment Act 2005, any work carried out on a vehicle at the roadside is classed as “restricted work”. This includes “the repair, maintenance, servicing, improvement or dismantling of a motor vehicle or of any part or accessory of a motor vehicle”.

The law also includes duties relating to the “installation, replacement or renewal of any such part or accessory”. Auto repair specialists Bumper have urged drivers to be aware of this “critical” issue, stressing that roadside repairs, maintenance or servicing are only permitted if the vehicle is broken down, Birmingham Live reports.

A spokesperson for the company said: “These regulations are in place to ensure public safety and maintain the quality of life for residents. Ignoring this rule can result in significant fines. Many drivers are unaware of the consequences of carrying out car repairs on public roads.

“The fines can be high, up to £2,500. This is designed to reduce disruption and danger associated with roadside repairs, and we strongly advise Brits to comply with this to avoid heavy fines.”

The 2005 law does emphasize how drivers can repair their own cars, but it does not allow drivers to carry out repairs for financial gain or profit. Experts warn that drivers can still be fined if the repairs cause excessive noise or air pollution. And the authorities can intervene to stop you from continuing with these activities and issue you with a fine.