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Doctor shares a common theme seen regularly in people who are about to die

Doctor shares a common theme seen regularly in people who are about to die

When people are dying, the senses tend to function in a certain order.

As the body approaches the end of its lifespan, something takes place that doctors call “active dying,” and Dr. James Hallenbeck of Stanford University explains in his book “Palliative Care Perspectives” how it all works.

You may have been told that hearing is the last sense to die, and according to Dr. Hallenbeck, that is true. However, he said that a person who has died can also feel things around them.

A study of hospice patients experiencing “active death” found that most unresponsive patients still responded to sounds they were presented with, with some hearing even up to their final moments.

While these may be the last senses to disappear, this is a common theme that marks the first step toward “active dying.”

People who work in palliative care have noticed a common pattern among people who are dying. (Getty Stock Photo)

People who work in palliative care have noticed a common pattern among people who are dying. (Getty Stock Photo)

And that’s usually a loss of appetite.

The sense of taste is preserved, but the desire to eat decreases as a person approaches the end of life.

The scientific reason for this is that the body needs fewer nutrients to sustain itself as it dies, causing appetite to disappear.

A hospice nurse explained that the human body is designed to die, so when a person reaches old age, his or her body is ready for the dying process.

Once appetite is gone, speech is usually the next possible function of the body to stop working.

A person does not suddenly lose the ability to speak, but as he or she nears the end, he or she usually speaks more slowly and conversations become more difficult.

Hearing may be the last thing to go, but appetite is usually the first. (Getty Stock Photo)

Hearing may be the last thing to go, but appetite is usually the first. (Getty Stock Photo)

In the final stages, before a person’s hearing and hearing deteriorate, the vision of a dying person may be affected.

This could explain why some people begin to hallucinate and see loved ones who have already passed away in their final moments.

What sometimes happens is something called ‘the rally’, where someone seems to get significantly better for a short period of time, which can give hope to their family and friends.

However, it is the body’s last gasp and hospice staff have learned to advise loved ones not to get their hopes up too high.

A palliative and critical care nurse in Los Angeles said about a third of the patients they provide palliative care to experience “the rally” in their final days.